Silver Book reference

The Value of Health and Longevity

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    • A modest decrease of 1% in cancer mortality has been estimated to be worth $500 billion in social value.  
    • Since 1950, reduction in heart disease mortality has added more than 3 1/2 years to the expected lifetimes of both men and women.  
    • Increased longevity added about $3.2 trillion per year to national wealth between 1970 and 2000, an uncounted value equal to approximately 1/2 of the average annual GDP during that period.  
    • A modest 1% reduction in cancer mortality would be worth close to $500 billion. A cure for cancer (if one is feasible) would be worth around $50 trillion.  
    • Every additional dollar spent on newer, less toxic hormonal therapy for breast cancer patients has produced health gains valued at between $27.03 and $36.81.  
    • During the twentieth century, cumulative gains in life expectancy, for both men and women, were worth over $1.2 million per person.  
    • The conditions and disabilities associated with stroke cost the United States between $30 billion and $40 billion a year.