Silver Book reference

The Economic Burden of Major Adult Visual Disorders in the United States

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    • Annual Direct and Indirect Costs of Diabetic Retinopathy
       
    • The average cost in 2004 per glaucoma patient age 40 to 64 using outpatient services was $276.  The average cost per patient 54 years and older was $254.  
    • The annual direct medical costs (including outpatient, inpatient, and prescription drug services) for Americans age 40 and older with diabetic retinopathy is $493 million.  
    • The average cost in 2004 per age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patient age 40 and older using medications and vitamins was $110.  
    • The annual direct medical costs (including outpatient, inpatient, and prescription drug services) for Americans age 40 and older with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is $575 million.  
    • The annual governmental budgetary impact of major adult visual disorders is estimated to be at least $13.7 billion  
    • The average annual salary for adults who are visually impaired is close to $10,000 less than for those with normal vision.  
    • The annual burden to the U.S. economy of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), cataract, diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, refractive errors, visual impairment, and blindness in adults age 40 and older is estimated…  
    • Close to $11 billion of the $11.1 billion in direct nonmedical costs for adults with visual disorders goes to nursing home care.  
    • Individuals who are visually impaired are less likely to be employed–44% are employed compared to 85% of adults with normal vision.  
    • The average annual salary for visually impaired adults is around $10,000 less than individuals with normal vision.  
    • Estimated Cost of Reduced Labor Force Participation by People Who are Visually Impaired or Blind  
    • Estimated Direct Nonmedical Costs for People Who Are Visually Impaired or Blind  
    • Annual Total Burden to the U.S. Economy of AMD, Cararact, Diabetic Retinopathy, Glaucoma, Refractive Errors, Visual Impairment and Blindness  
    • The cost of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is projected to increase to $845 million per year over the next 15 years, simply due to the growth in the number of…  
    • The average cost in 2004 per glaucoma patient age 40 to 64 using medications and vitamins was $806.  
    • The average cost in 2004 per glaucoma patient age 40 to 64 using inpatient services was $2,270. The average cost per patient 65 years and older was $4,929.  
    • The average cost in 2004 per glaucoma patient age 40 to 64 using outpatient services was $276. The average cost per patient 54 years and older was $254.  
    • The annual direct medical costs (including outpatient, inpatient, and prescription drug services) for Americans age 40 and older with glaucoma is $2.86 billion.  
    • The average cost in 2004 per diabetic retinopathy patient age 40 to 64 using outpatient services was $629. The average cost per patient 65 years and older was $463.  
    • The average cost in 2004 per age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patient age 40 to 64 using outpatient services was $305. The average cost per patient 65 years and older was…  
    • Around $62 million a year is spent on guide dogs for individuals 40 years and older with visual impairment (in 2004 dollars).  
    • Visual impairment and blindness account for $8 billion in lost productivity annually.  
    • In 2001, approximately 2.9 million glaucoma patients visited physicians or hospitals for treatment of their disease.  
    • In 2001, approximately 5.6 million prescriptions were filled for glaucoma patients.  
    • In 2001, approximately 420,000 diabetic retinopathy patients visited physicians or hospitals for treatment of their disease.  
    • In 2001, an estimated 1.4 million age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients visited physicians or hospitals for treatment of their disease.  
    • Based on estimates from 1997 data, around 115,583 visually impaired and 74,133 blind individuals who did not work, would have worked if they had been fully sighted.  
    • An estimated 424,801 more visually impaired and blind individuals live in nursing homes than would be expected if they had normal vision.  
    • While only 4.3% of the 65 and older population lives in nursing homes, 16% of those who are visually impaired and 40% of those who are blind reside in nursing…