Silver Book reference

National Diabetes Statistics Report, 2014: Estimates of diabetes and its burden in the United States

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    • Death rates are 1.5 times higher in adults with diabetes, than in adults without the disease.  
    • Deaths from diabetes are underreported with one study finding that only 35% to 40% of people with diabetes who died had the disease listed anywhere on their death certificate.  
    • In 2010, diabetes was the 7th leading cause of death – with more than 69,000 deaths with diabetes as the underlying cause of death, and more than 234,000 with diabetes…  
    • In 2010, around 73,000 lower-limb amputations were performed in adults with diagnosed diabetes. These amputations account for around 60% of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations in people age 20 and older.  
    • In 2011, diabetes was listed as the primary cause of kidney failure in 44% of all new cases; close to 50,000 people began treatment for kidney failure due to diabetes;…  
    • 4.2 million U.S. adults age 40 and older with diabetes, had diabetic retinopathy (from 2005 – 2008).  
    • Hospitalization rates for stroke are 1.5 times higher in adults with diabetes, than in adults without the disease.  
    • Hospitalization rates for heart attack are 1.8 times higher in adults with diabetes, than in adults without the disease.  
    • Death rates from cardiovascular disease are around 1.7 times higher in adults with diabetes, than in adults without the disease.  
    • From 2009 – 2012, 65% of adults with diabetes had high LDL cholesterol or used cholesterol-lowering medications.  
    • From 2009 – 2012, 71% of adults with diabetes had high blood pressure or used medications to lower their HBP.  
    • From 2009 – 2012, an estimated 86 million American adults had prediabetes—37% of adults age 20 and older, and 51% of adults age 65 and older.  
    • More than 29 million people in the U.S.—9.3% of the population, had diabetes in 2014.  Of those, 8 million people were undiagnosed.