Silver Book reference

Economic Costs of Diabetes in the U.S. in 2002

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    • In 2002, 51.8% of direct medical expenditures from diabetes were incurred by people over 65 years old.  
    • Diabetes caused 176,000 cases of permanent disability in 2002–costing $7.5 billion.  
    • U.S. health care use attributable to diabetes by medical condition (in thousands)  
    • Health care use attributable to diabetes in the U.S., by age and type of service, 2002 (in thousands)  
    • Proportion of Female Population with Confirmed Diabetes in 2002  
    • Proportion of Male Population with Confirmed Diabetes in 2002  
    • Projected impact of changing demographic characteristics on the national cost of diabetes: 2002 – 2020 (in 2002 billions of dollars)  
    • Total cost of diabetes, 2002  
    • Mortality costs attributable to diabetes, 2002  
    • Morbidity costs attributable to diabetes, 2002  
    • Total health care expenditures by diabetes status, 2002 (in millions of dollars and % of U.S. total)  
    • Health care expenditures attributable to diabetes, by medical condition and type of service, 2002 (in millions of dollars)  
    • Health care expenditures attributable to diabetes in the U.S., by age and type of service, 2002 (in millions of dollars)  
    • Share of total U.S. health care use attributable to diabetes by medical condition  
    • Proportion of U.S. health care use attributable to diabetes for various conditions  
    • Projections of the U.S. population diagnosed with diabetes (in millions)  
    • In 2002, the major expenditure groups for diabetes by service setting were inpatient days (43.9%), nursing home care (15.1%) and office visits (10.9%).  
    • Diabetes caused 176,000 cases of permanent disability in 2002.  
    • The annual cost of diabetes, in 2002 dollars, could rise to an estimated $156 billion by 2010, and $192 billion by 2020.  
    • In 2002, people with diabetes had medical expenditures that were 2.4 times higher than those without the disease.