Silver Book reference

Causes and Prevalence of Visual Impairment Among Adults in the United States

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    • By 2020, the number of Americans age 40 and older who are blind is projected to reach 1.6 million– growing 70% from 1 million in 2004.  
    • By 2020, the number of Americans age 40 and older with low vision is projected to reach 3.9 million– growing from 2.4 million in 2004.  
    • By 2020, the number of Americans age 40 and older who are blind or have low vision is projected to reach 5.5 million– growing from 3.3 million in 2004.  
    • Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness among age-related eye diseases in Hispanic persons– accounting for 28.6% of cases of blindness.  
    • Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among white Americans– accounting for 54% of cases of blindness.  
    • In one study, individuals age 80 and older made up 8% of the population, yet accounted for 69% of cases of blindness.  
    • Americans age 80 and older have the highest rates of blindness. They are also the fastest growing segment of our population.  
    • Around 648,000 Americans age 80 and older are blind– 7% of the 80 and older population.  
    • More than 1.5 million Americans age 80 and older have low vision– 16.7% of the 80 and older population.  
    • More than 2.1 million Americans age 80 and older have low vision or are blind– 23.7% of the 80 and older population.  
    • An estimated 1 million Americans over the age of 40 are legally blind.  
    • An estimated 2.4 million Americans over the age of 40 have low vision.  
    • Low vision or blindness affects 1 in 28 Americans over the age of 40– 3.3 million Americans.