Silver Book reference

Cancer Facts & Figures 2008

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    • Leading Sites of New Cancer Cases and Deaths–2008 Estimates  
    • Five-Year Relative Survival Rates by Stage at Diagnosis, 1996-2003  
    • Probability of Developing Invasive Cancers Over Selected Age Intervals by Sex, US, 2002-2004  
    • Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates by Site, Race, and Ethnicity, US, 2000-2004  
    • Age-Adjusted Cancer Death Rates, Females by Site, US, 1930-2004  
    • Age-Adjusted Cancer Death Rates, Males by Site, US, 1930-2004  
    • In 2008, it is estimated that 3,870 Americans will die from cervical cancer.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 11,070 cases of invasive cervical cancer are expected to be diagnosed.  
    • In 2008, 68,810 new cases of bladder cancer are expected to occur.  
    • An estimated 11,200 skin cancer deaths will occur in 2008–8,420 from melanoma and 2,780 from other skin cancers.  
    • In 2008, about 62,480 Americans will be diagnosed with melanoma–the most common serious form of skin cancer.  
    • In 2008, there will be an estimated 28,660 deaths from prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 186,320 new prostate cancer cases will occur in the U.S. Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 37,680 new cases of pancreatic cancer are expected in the U.S.  
    • 15,520 ovarian cancer deaths are expected in 2008. Ovarian cancer causes the most deaths of any cancer of the female reproductive system.  
    • 21,650 new cases of ovarian cancer are expected in 2008.  
    • 35,310 new cases of oral cancer are expected in 2008.  
    • It is estimated that 74,340 new cases of lymphoma will occur in 2008–8,220 cases of Hodgkin lymphoma and 66,120 cases of non-Hodgkin.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 161,840 lung cancer deaths are expected to occur, which accounts for about 29% of all cancer deaths.  
    • In 2008, an estimated 215,020 new cases of lung cancer are expected, accounting for about 15% of cancer diagnoses.  
    • Mortality rates for colorectal cancer have declined over the past 2 decades and have had a steeper decline in the most recent time period (1.8% per year from 1985-2002 compared…  
    • In 2008, about 49,960 deaths from colon and rectum cancer are expected to occur in the U.S.–accounting for 9% of all cancer deaths.  
    • An estimated 108,070 Americans will be diagnosed with colon cancer in 2008; 40,740 will be diagnosed with rectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is the 3rd most common cancer among men and…  
    • Death rates from breast cancer have steadily decreased in women since 1990. This decrease represents progress in both early detection and improved treatment.  
    • Breast cancer is the second cause of cancer death among American women. In 2008, an estimated 40,480 deaths from breast cancer in women are expected.  
    • In the U.S., 67,770 new cases of in situ breast cancer are expected to occur among women in 2008.  
    • In the U.S., approximately 182,460 new cases of invasive breast cancer are expected to occur among women in 2008; around 1,990 cases are expected in men.  
    • The NIH estimate overall cancer costs in 2007 at about $219.2 billion–$89 billion for direct medical costs, $18.2 billion for indirect morbidity costs (costs due to lost productivity due to…  
    • The 5-year survival rate for all cancers diagnosed from 1996-2003 is 66%, up from 50% in 1975-1977. This improvement reflects progress in early diagnosis and improvements in treatment.  
    • Cancer is the second most common cause of death in the U.S., accounting for 1 of every 4 deaths.  
    • 565,650 Americans are expected to die of cancer this year, more than 1,500 people each day.  
    • It is expected that there will be 1,437,180 new cancer cases diagnosed in 2008.  
    • In the U.S., men have a less than 1 in 2 lifetime risk of developing cancer; the risk is a little more than 1 in 3 for women.  
    • Approximately 77% of all cancers are diagnosed in Americans 55 and older.