Silver Book reference

2012 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures

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    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved five drugs that temporarily improve Alzheimer’s disease symptoms.  
    • When the first wave of baby boomers reaches age 85 (in 2031), an estimated 3.5 million people age 85 and older will have Alzheimer’s.  
    • By 2050, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease may triple, from 5.2 million to a projected 11 million to 16 million, barring the development of medical…  
    • By 2025, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease is estimated to reach 6.7 million— a 30 percent increase from the 5.2 million age 65 and…  
    • In 2000, there were an estimated 411,000 new cases of Alzheimer’s disease. For 2010, that number was estimated to be 454,000 (a 10% increase); by 2030, it is projected to…  
    • Because of the increase in the number of people over 65 in the United States, the annual incidence and other dementias is projected to double by 2050.  
    • In 2009, 6% of all people admitted to hospices in the United States had a primary hospice diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • An estimated 60 to 70 percent of older adults with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias live in the community compared with 98 percent of older adults without Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.  
    • In 2009, 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s and other dementias also had coronary heart disease, 29 percent also had diabetes, 22 percent also had congestive heart failure,…  
    • Over 15 million Americans provide unpaid care for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias.  
    • Between 2000 and 2008, deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s disease increased 66 percent, while those attributed to the number one cause of death, heart disease, decreased 13 percent.  
    • Based on 2008 final data from the National Center for Health Statistics, Alzheimer’s was reported as the underlying cause of death for 82,435 people.  
    • Total Medicaid spending for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is projected to be $35.5 billion in 2012.  
    • Aggregate payments for health care, long-term care and hospice for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are projected to increase from $200 billion in 2012 to $1.1 trillion in 2050 (in 2012 dollars).  
    • It is projected that the United States will need an additional 3.5 million health care providers by 2030 just to maintain the current ratio of health care workers to the population.  
    • In 2012, total out-of-pocket spending for individuals with Alzheimer’s and other dementias is estimated at $33.8 billion  
    • In 2008, Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s and other dementias paid $9,368 out-of-pocket on average for health care and long-term care services that were not covered by additional sources.  
    • Medicaid paid $23,953 (in 2011 dollars) per person for Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s and other dementias living in a long-term care facility compared with $222 for those with the diagnosis…  
    • Among nursing home residents with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, 51 percent rely on Medicaid to help pay for their nursing home care.  
    • In 2011, the average cost for a nonmedical home health aide was $21 per hour, or $168 for an eight-hour day.  
    • In 2008, 23% of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias had at least one home health visit during the year, compared with 10% of Medicare beneficiaries without Alzheimer’s…  
    • In 2008, there were 349 skilled nursing facility stays per 1,000 beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s and other dementias compared with 39 stays per 1,000 beneficiaries for people without these conditions.  
    • In 2008, there were 780 hospital stays per 1,000 Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias compared with 234 hospital stays per 1,000 Medicare beneficiaries without these conditions.  
    • Total payments for Alzheimer’s disease in 2012 are estimated at $200 billion, including $140 billion for Medicare and Medicaid combined in 2012 dollars.  
    • 29% of older individuals withAlzheimer’s disease and other dementias who have Medicare also have Medicaid coverage, compared with 11% of individuals without dementia.  
    • The estimated  economic value of the care provided by family and other unpaid caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias was $210.5 billion in 2011.  
    • In 2011, the 15.2 million family and other unpaid caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias provided an estimated 17.4 billion hours of unpaid care.  
    • In 2008, average Medicaid payments per person for Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s and other dementias were 19 times as great as average Medicaid payments for Medicare…  
    • Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s and other dementias were three times as great as payments for other Medicare beneficiaries in the same age group ($43,847 per person for those with Alzheimer’s and other dementias compared…  
    • Eighty percent of Alzheimer’s care provided at home is delivered by family caregivers; fewer than 10 percent of older adults receive all of their care from paid workers.  
    • In 2011, Alzheimer’s caregivers provided an estimated 17.4 billion hours of unpaid care, a contribution to the nation valued at over $210 billion.  
    • Nearly half of people age 85 and older (45%) have Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • One in eight people age 65 and older (13%) has Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • In 2012, the 85-years-and-older population includes about 2.5 million people with Alzheimer’s disease, or 48 percent of the Alzheimer’s population age 65 and older.  
    • By the middle of the century, someone in America will develop Alzheimer’s disease every 33 seconds.  
    • Every 68 seconds, someone in America develops Alzheimer’s disease.   
    • The estimated annual incidence of Alzheimer’s disease appears to increase dramatically with age, from approximately 53 new cases per 1,000 people age 65 to 74, to 170 new cases per…  
    • 16% of women age 71 and older have Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias compared with 11% of men.  
    • Of the 5.2 million people over age 65 with Alzheimer’s in the United States, 3.4 million are women and 1.8 million are men.  
    • Of those with Alzheimer’s disease, an estimated 4 percent are under age 65, 6 percent are 65 to 74, 44 percent are 75 to 84, and 46 percent are 85…  
    • 85+ population by 2050
      By 2050, the number of Americans age 85 years and older will nearly quadruple to 21 million.  
    • An estimated 5.4 million Americans of all ages have Alzheimer’s disease in 2012, including 5.2 million people age 65 and older.  
    • Alzheimer’s Disease is the most common type of dementia; it accounts for an estimated 60 to 80 percent of cases.  
    • The greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease is advancing age, but Alzheimer’s is not a normal part of aging.