Silver Book reference

2008 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures

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    • Baby boomers start turning 65 in 2011, which puts them at the greatest risk for Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • Alzheimer’s disease is the 5th leading cause of death in Americans age 65 and older.  
    • Around 14 million baby boomers can expect to develop dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • The aging baby boomers
      The baby boomer group now includes about 78 million Americans–27 million are ages 55-62 and 51 million ages 44-54.  
    • Around 10 million of the 78 million U.S. baby boomers who are alive today can expect to develop Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • 1 in 6 women and 1 in 10 men who live to be at least 55 years old will develop Alzheimer’s disease in their lifetime.  
    • Alzheimer’s disease was the 7th-leading cause of death for people of all ages and the 5th-leading cause of death for people age 65 and over.  
    • In 2005, Alzheimer’s disease was listed as the underlying cause of death for 71,696 Americans.  
    • The death rate from Alzheimer’s disease for those aged 85 and over increased by 22.6% between 2000 and 2004.  
    • “When baby boomers begin to reach the median age for admission to a nursing home in 2025, Medicaid spending for nursing home residents with Alzheimer’s disease will increase rapidly, from…  
    • In 2000, 29% of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias were also Medicaid beneficiaries.  
    • In June 2007, 46.4% of all nursing home residents had Alzheimer’s or another dementia.  
    • A study of disease severity in 2003 showed that about 60% of assisted living residents with dementia were in the moderate or severe stages of the disease.  
    • In 2000, total Medicare costs per person for beneficiaries with diabetes and Alzheimer’s or another dementia were $19,994, compared with $8,011 for beneficiaries with diabetes but no Alzheimer’s or other…  
    • 30% of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and over who have Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias also have coronary heart disease and 28% have congestive heart failure.  
    • At any time, about 25% of older hospital patients are people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.  
    • “In 2000, Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and over with Alzheimer’s and other dementias had an average of 1.3 times more physician visits than did other Medicare beneficiaries in the same…  
    • “In 2000, Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and over with Alzheimer’s and other dementias were 3.4 times more likely than other Medicare beneficiaries in the same age group to have a…  
    • Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias cost state and federal Medicaid $21 billion in nursing home care in 2005, which is projected to increase to $24 billion in 2010 and $27…  
    • In 2005, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias cost Medicare $91 billion, which is projected to increase to $160 billion by 2010 and $189 billion by 2015.  
    • In 2007, the value of care provided by unpaid caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias was $89 billion.  
    • In 2007, the 9.8 million family and other unpaid caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias provided 8.4 billion hours of care.  
    • 29% of all unpaid caregivers of older people in the U.S. are caring for a person with Alzheimer’s or another dementia.  
    • 9.8 million family members, friends and neighbors provided unpaid care for someone diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia in 2007.  
    • Close to 10 million Americans provide unpaid care for people with dementia. In 2007, they provided 8.4 billion hours of unpaid care, valued at $89 million.  
    • By 2050, more than 60% of people with Alzheimer’s disease will be age 85 or older.  
    • By 2050, the number of individuals age 65 and over with Alzheimer’s could range from 11 million to 16 million.  
    • There were an estimated 411,000 new cases of Alzheimer’s disease in 2000. That number is expected to increase to 454,000 new cases a year by 2010, 615,000 new cases a year…  
    • Currently, a person in the U.S. develops Alzheimer’s disease every 71 seconds. This will increase to every 33 seconds by the middle of this century.  
    • About 5.2 million people in the U.S. have Alzheimer’s disease in 2008.  
    • Advancing age is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. A majority of Americans that are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease are 65 or older.  
    • Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60% to 80% of all dementia diagnoses.  
    • In 2005, Medicare spent $91 billion caring for those with Alzheimer’s disease.