Silver Book reference

2007 Alzheimer’s Disease Facts and Figures

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    • In 2002, community-living older individuals who used paid services used almost double the number of hours monthly (200 hours) compared to those who had no cognitive impairment (108 hours).  
    • By 2030, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease is estimated to be about 7.7 million, which is more than a 50% increase over the number…  
    • Alzheimer’s disease drains more than $148 billion from the nation’s economy each year.  
    • Close to 1/3 of caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias now exercise less than before they started caregiving, compared to 1/4 of other caregivers.  
    • Almost 1/4 of caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias reported that caring for this individual was stressful, compared to 15% of other caregivers.  
    • In 2003, close to 1 in 4 caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias provided 40 hours a week or more of care. 71% provided this care for…  
    • For beneficiaries diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, state and federal nursing home care is expected to increase from $21 billion in 2005 to $24 billion in 2010, and $27…  
    • Medicare spending on beneficiaries diagnosed with dementias is projected to increase from $91 billion in 2005 to $160 billion by 2010, and $189 billion by 2015.  
    • In 2025, when baby boomers with severe disabilities or diseases–such as Alzheimer’s disease–reach the median age for nursing home care admission, Medicaid costs just for nursing home care will increase…  
    • Baby boomers in the U.S. (2005)
      As of July 1, 2005, there were about 78.2 million baby boomers in the U.S. Starting in 2006, 330 of them will turn 60 every hour.  
    • In 2002, nearly 1/3 of community-living older individuals with cognitive impairment who received daily activity assistance used paid services, which were usually combined with unpaid assistance. 12% of those who…  
    • Among the elderly, hospitalization of a spouse for dementia correlated to an increase risk of death for the partner that was not hospitalized. Among men, 8.6% died within a year…  
    • “8% of working caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementia turned down a promotion (4% of other caregivers), and 7% lost job benefits (3% for other caregivers).”  
    • Of caregivers who work, 2/3 who cared for people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias reported that they missed work, compared to 57% of other caregivers.  
    • Over 40% of caregivers who care for people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias report high levels of stress.  
    • In 2003, 65% of Alzheimer caregivers performed personal care that was physically demanding. These tasks can be made difficult by the person with dementia, who may be unable to help…  
    • Unpaid caregivers of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia provide the U.S. with an economic asset worth almost $83 billion in 2005.  
    • Almost 10 million (29%) of all caregivers of people age 60 and older are caring for a person with Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.  
    • Hospice admissions for Americans with dementia increased from 6.8% of all admissions in 2001 to 9.8% in 2005.  
    • In 2005, 50% of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease who were hospitalized for pneumonia or hip fracture died within 6 months. Patients without cognitive impairment were less likely to die after…  
    • In 2002, about 26% of older community-living adults with severe disabilities (cannot perform 3 or more daily activities) were cognitively impaired.  
    • In 2002, more than 9 out of 10 community-living older individuals with cognitive impairment received daily activity assistance from family, friends or paid workers. Slightly less than 50% of those…  
    • At least 50% of the elderly participants in adult day services have Alzheimer’s or another dementia.  
    • At least 50% of elderly residents of assisted living facilities have Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.  
    • About 47% of nursing home residents have a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or another dementia in their medical record.””  
    • About 70% of nursing home residents have some cognitive impairment.  
    • 70% of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias are cared for by family and friends at home.  
    • In 2002, Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older who had been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or other dementias had to pay 37% of nursing home care costs out of pocket.  
    • In 2003, Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older who were diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or other dementias spent an average of $3,455 (22%) of their income on health care.  
    • “Costs to business for employees who are caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias amount to $36.5 billion. These costs result from lost productivity, missed work and costs to…  
    • Direct and indirect costs of Alzheimer’s and other dementias are more than $148 billion annually.  
    • 95% of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and over with Alzheimer’s and other dementias have at least one other chronic condition.””  
    • Medicare beneficiaries who were diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias visited a physician 1.3 times more frequently than other beneficiaries.  
    • Compared to a person who does not have dementia, the hospital costs for someone who has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease were, on average, 3.2 times higher.  
    • Americans with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias have 3.4 times more hospital stays than the average for someone who does not have dementia.  
    • On average, Medicare spends about 3 times more per beneficiary diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or other dementias, compared to someone who does not have dementia ($13,207 compared to $4,454).  
    • Pneumonia and other infections were the most likely cause of hospitalization for nursing home residents who suffer from dementias, including Alzheimer’s disease.  
    • 60% of Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older with dementia also have hypertension. 30% of Americans with dementia have coronary artery disease.  
    • The typical first symptom of Alzheimer’s disease is memory loss for recent events.