Silver Book publication

Silver Book: Valve Disease Volume

As many as 11.6 million Americans in the U.S. have heart valve disease (HVD), and more than 1 in 10 adults ages 75 and older have HVD. Thankfully, the HVD field has experienced tremendous advances in improving survival, recovery, and quality of life for patients.

12 Matching Facts

Search matching Facts:
No results to display
    • The rate of hospitalization from heart failure before and after transcatheter mitral valve repair (TMVR) decreases 73% (per patient year) in patients at prohibitive surgical risk.
       
    • The volume of mitral valve surgical procedures increased approximately 8.3% from 2010 to 2013.
       
    • The annual total incremental per patient health care expenditures for heart valve disease patients ranged from $1,755 in 1996 to $12,789 in 2011.
       
    • Pulmonary hypertension is a complication in at least 23% of patients with significant mitral regurgitation due to flail leaflet, and approximately doubles the risk of death and heart failure after diagnosis.
       
    • Mitral regurgitation patients who did not undergo surgery saw an increased use of medical therapies from 12% to 47% over 4.5 years.
       
    • Hospital Discharges from Heart Valve Disease in 2010*
       
    • Mortality and Any-Mention Mortality for Heart Valve Disease in 2014*
       
    • Moderate or severe aortic valve disease is present in 4.2% to 10.7% of the population ages 65 and older.
       
    • Mitral valve disease is present in 5.1% of the population ages 65 and older.
       
    • Risk of heart valve disease increases with age
      Between the ages of 18 and 44, less than 1% of the U.S. population has heart valve disease. This increases to 8.5% between ages 65 and 74, and 13.2% after…  
    • Prevalence estimates for heart valve disease are likely low.
      A U.K. population screening found previously undetected heart valve disease in 1 in 2 adults ages 65+.  
    • Mitral valve disease costs
      Mitral valve disease (symptomatic and asymptomatic) costs the U.S. at least $13.2 billion in direct healthcare expenditures each year.