Silver Book Fact

With the exception of 1918, cardiovascular disease has been the leading cause of death in the U.S. since 1900.

Roger, Veronique L., Alan S. Go, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, Emelia J. Benjamin, Jarret D. Berry, et al.; on behalf of the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics–2012 Update. Circulation. 2012; 125: e2-e220. http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/125/1/e2

Reference

Title
Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics–2012 Update
Publication
Circulation
Publisher
American Heart Association
Publication Date
2012
Authors
Roger, Veronique L., Alan S. Go, Donald M. Lloyd-Jones, Emelia J. Benjamin, Jarret D. Berry, et al.; on behalf of the American Heart Association Statistics Committee and Stroke Statistics Subcommittee
Pages
e2-e220
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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