Silver Book Fact

Visual loss from subfoveal choroidal neovascularization, a characteristic of wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), was found to have a profound impact on how patients felt about their health-related quality of life–rating it as low or lower than patients with renal failure and AIDS.

Bass E, Marsh M, Mangione C, Bressler N, et al. Patients’ Perceptions of the Value of Current Vision: Assessment of preference values among patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularization– The Submacular Surgery Trials Vision Preference Value Scale. Arch Opthalmol. 2004; 122(12): 1856-67. http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/122/12/1856

Reference

Title
Patients’ Perceptions of the Value of Current Vision: Assessment of preference values among patients with subfoveal choroidal neovascularization– The Submacular Surgery Trials Vision Preference Value Scale
Publication
Arch Opthalmol
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Bass E, Marsh M, Mangione C, Bressler N, et al
Volume & Issue
Volume 122, Issue 12
Pages
1856-67
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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