Silver Book Fact

Visual impairment and blindness cause an annual health utility loss of approximately $10.5 billion. This figure measures lost quality of life when a disease has little or no short-term impact on mortality.

Frick, Kevin D., Emily W. Gower, John H. Kempen, and Jennifer L. Wolff. Economic Impact of Visual Impairment and Blindness in the United States. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2007; 125(4): 544-50. http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/125/4/544

Reference

Title
Economic Impact of Visual Impairment and Blindness in the United States
Publication
Archives of Ophthalmology
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Frick, Kevin D., Emily W. Gower, John H. Kempen, and Jennifer L. Wolff
Volume & Issue
Volume 125, Issue 4
Pages
544-50
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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