Silver Book Fact

Use of shingles vaccine could save $82 to $103 million

Use of the shingles vaccine in immunocompetent adults ages 60 and older could save between $82 and $103 million in healthcare costs associated with the diagnosis and treatment of shingles, post-herpetic neuralgia, and other complications.

Pellesier J, Brisson M, Levin M. Evaluation of the Cost-Effectiveness in the United States of a Vaccine to Prevent Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia in Older Adults. Vaccine. 2007; 25(49): 8326-37. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17980938

Reference

Title
Evaluation of the Cost-Effectiveness in the United States of a Vaccine to Prevent Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia in Older Adults
Publication
Vaccine
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Pellesier J, Brisson M, Levin M
Volume & Issue
Volume 25, Issue 49
Pages
8326-37
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Economic Value
  • Future Value

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