Silver Book Fact

Unplanned Hospital Readmissions & Costs Following Sepsis Hospitalizations

Among 187,697 hospital admissions for medical reasons that were associated with an unplanned 30-day readmission,  147,084 had a diagnosis of sepsis, 15,001 had a diagnosis of AMI, 79,480 were diagnosed with heart failure, 54,396 were diagnosed with COPD, and 59,378 were diagnosed with pneumonia.

The estimated mean cost per readmission was highest for sepsis ($10,070) compared with the other diagnoses including COPD ($8,417),  heart failure ($9,051), AMI ($9,424), and pneumonia ($9533).

Proportion and Cost of Unplanned 30-Day Readmissions After Sepsis Compared With Other Medical Conditions. Journal of American Medical Association Web site. http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2598785. Published January 22 2017. Accessed January 27, 2017

Reference

Title
Proportion and Cost of Unplanned 30-Day Readmissions After Sepsis Compared With Other Medical Conditions
Publication
Journal of American Medical Association
Publication Date
Published January 22 2017
URL
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Categories

  • Economic Burden

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