Silver Book Fact

U.S. spending on cancer treatment has risen greatly over time, from $13.1 billion in 1980 to $72.1 billion in 2004. 

Phillipson T, Eber M, Lakdawalla D, Corral M, et al. An Analysis Of Whether Higher Health Care Spending In The United States Versus Europe Is ‘Worth It’ In The Case of Cancer. Health Affairs. 2012; 31(4): 667-675

Reference

Title
An Analysis Of Whether Higher Health Care Spending In The United States Versus Europe Is ‘Worth It’ In The Case of Cancer
Publication
Health Affairs
Publisher
Project HOPE
Publication Date
2012
Authors
Phillipson T, Eber M, Lakdawalla D, Corral M, et al.
Volume & Issue
Volume 31, Issue 4
Pages
667-675

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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  • In 2013 alone, an esimated 1.6 million Americans were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer.  
  • The value of life lost from cancer deaths is projected to reach $147.6 billion in 2020.  
  • The total cost of cancer in 2014 is $216.6 billion–$86.6 billion for medical expenses and $130 billion for loss of productivity.  
  • 43% of older men and 45% of older women with a history of cancer report some type of activity limitation.