Silver Book Fact

U.S. health care spending increased 6.9% in 2005 to almost $2.0 trillion, or $6,697 a person.

Catlin, Aaron, Cathy Cowan, Stephen Heffler, Benjamin Washington, The National Health Expenditure Accounts Team. National Health Spending In 2005: The slowdown continues. Health Affairs. 2007; 26(1): 142-153

Reference

Title
National Health Spending In 2005: The slowdown continues
Publication
Health Affairs
Publisher
Project HOPE
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Catlin, Aaron, Cathy Cowan, Stephen Heffler, Benjamin Washington, The National Health Expenditure Accounts Team
Volume & Issue
Volume 26, Issue 1
Pages
142-153

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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  • In 2004 and 2005, hospital spending continued to grow quickly by 7.9% each year and accounted for the largest share of the overall spending increase in both years.  
  • Percentage of noninstitutionalized Medicare enrollees age 65 and over who have limitations in instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) and who receive personal assistance, by age group, selected years 1992-2007  
  • Percentage of Medicare enrollees age 65 and over with functional limitations, by residential setting, 2005  
  • Prescription drug spending growth accelerated in 2006 to 8.5%, partly as a result of Medicare Part D’s impact.