Silver Book Fact

U.S. health care spending increased 6.9% in 2005 to almost $2.0 trillion, or $6,697 a person.

Catlin, Aaron, Cathy Cowan, Stephen Heffler, Benjamin Washington, The National Health Expenditure Accounts Team. National Health Spending In 2005: The slowdown continues. Health Affairs. 2007; 26(1): 142-153

Reference

Title
National Health Spending In 2005: The slowdown continues
Publication
Health Affairs
Publisher
Project HOPE
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Catlin, Aaron, Cathy Cowan, Stephen Heffler, Benjamin Washington, The National Health Expenditure Accounts Team
Volume & Issue
Volume 26, Issue 1
Pages
142-153

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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