Silver Book Fact

Treatment of patients with advanced dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) implants resulted in stabilization of visual acuity.  A sub-group analysis found that 100% of patients receiving a high-dose lost <15 letters of acuity–compared with 55.6% in the combined low-dose/sham group.  The high-dose group had a 0.6 mean letter gain while the low-dose/sham group had a mean 9.7 letter loss.

Zhang, Kang, Jill J. Hopkins, Jeffrey S. Heier, David G. Birch, Lawrence S. Halperin, Thomas A. Albini, David M. Brown, Glenn J. Jaffe, Weng Tao, and George A. Williams. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Delievered by Encapsulated Cell Intraocular Implants for Treatment of Geographic Atrophy in Age-Related Macular Degeneration. PNAS. 2011; 108(15). http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2011/03/24/1018987108

Reference

Title
Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Delievered by Encapsulated Cell Intraocular Implants for Treatment of Geographic Atrophy in Age-Related Macular Degeneration
Publication
PNAS
Publication Date
2011
Authors
Zhang, Kang, Jill J. Hopkins, Jeffrey S. Heier, David G. Birch, Lawrence S. Halperin, Thomas A. Albini, David M. Brown, Glenn J. Jaffe, Weng Tao, and George A. Williams
Volume & Issue
Volume 108, Issue 15
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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