Silver Book Fact

Total hospital spending growth is expected to stay an average of 2% higher than GDP growth between 2006 and 2015.

Borger, Christine, Sheila Smith, Christopher Truffer, Sean Keehan, Andrea Sisko, John Poisal, and M. Kent Clemens. Health Spending Projections Through 2015: Changes on the horizon. Health Affairs. 2006; 25(2): w61-w73. http://content.healthaffairs.org/cgi/content/abstract/25/2/w61?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=CMS&andorexactfulltext=and&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&resourcetype=HWCIT

Reference

Title
Health Spending Projections Through 2015: Changes on the horizon
Publication
Health Affairs
Publication Date
2006
Authors
Borger, Christine, Sheila Smith, Christopher Truffer, Sean Keehan, Andrea Sisko, John Poisal, and M. Kent Clemens
Volume & Issue
Volume 25, Issue 2
Pages
w61-w73
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Economic Burden

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