Silver Book Fact

The value of life lost from all cancer deaths in 2000 was $960 billion.

Yabroff, K, C Bradley, A Mariotto, M Brown, and E Feuer. Estimates and Projections of Value of Life Lost from Cancer Deaths in the United States. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2008; 100(24): 1755-62. https://academic.oup.com/jnci/article/100/24/1755/2606867/Estimates-and-Projections-of-Value-of-Life-Lost

Reference

Title
Estimates and Projections of Value of Life Lost from Cancer Deaths in the United States
Publication
J Natl Cancer Inst
Publication Date
2008
Authors
Yabroff, K, C Bradley, A Mariotto, M Brown, and E Feuer
Volume & Issue
Volume 100, Issue 24
Pages
1755-62
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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  • The value of life lost from all cancer deaths in 2000 was $960 billion.