Silver Book Fact

The size of the U.S. population age 65 and older will double over the next 25 years, growing to 70 million by 2030 when the youngest of the baby boomers will be more than 65 years old. Because age is a known risk factor for Alzheimer’s, there could be an increase of 70% diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in the U.S., with an estimated 7.7 million people affected.

Alzheimer’s Disease Growth: U.S. will see average 44 percent increase in Alzheimer’s disease by 2025. http://www.alz.org/alzwa/documents/alzwa_resource_ad_fs_ad_state_growth_stats.pdf. Published 2004

Reference

Title
Alzheimer’s Disease Growth: U.S. will see average 44 percent increase in Alzheimer’s disease by 2025
Publisher
Alzheimer’s Association
Publication Date
Published 2004
Authors
Alzheimer's Association
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Human Burden

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