Silver Book Fact

The percentage of recommended care received by Medicare beneficiaries was 3.2% higher than those who did not have health insurance.

Asch, Steven M., Eve A. Kerr, Joan Keesey, John L. Adams, Claude M. Setodji, Shaista Malik, and Elizabeth A. McGlynn. Who Is at Greatest Risk for Receiving Poor-Quality Health Care?. NEJM. 2006; 354: 1147-1156. http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/354/11/1147

Reference

Title
Who Is at Greatest Risk for Receiving Poor-Quality Health Care?
Publication
NEJM
Publisher
MA Medical Society
Publication Date
2006
Authors
Asch, Steven M., Eve A. Kerr, Joan Keesey, John L. Adams, Claude M. Setodji, Shaista Malik, and Elizabeth A. McGlynn
Pages
1147-1156
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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