Silver Book Fact

The number of people with Parkinson’s disease in the U.S. is expected to double between 2005 and 2030.

Dorsey, E. Ray, Radu Constantinescu, Joel P. Thompson, Kevin M. Biglan, Robert G. Holloway, Karl Kieburtz, Fred J. Marshall, Bernard M. Ravina, Giovanni Schifitto, Andrew Siderowf, and Caroline M. Tanner. Projected Number of People with Parkinson Disease in the Most Populous Nations, 2005 Through 2030. Neurology. 2007; 68(5): 384-6. http://www.neurology.org/cgi/content/abstract/68/5/384

Reference

Title
Projected Number of People with Parkinson Disease in the Most Populous Nations, 2005 Through 2030
Publication
Neurology
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Dorsey, E. Ray, Radu Constantinescu, Joel P. Thompson, Kevin M. Biglan, Robert G. Holloway, Karl Kieburtz, Fred J. Marshall, Bernard M. Ravina, Giovanni Schifitto, Andrew Siderowf, and Caroline M. Tanner
Volume & Issue
Volume 68, Issue 5
Pages
384-6
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Economic Burden

Related Facts

  • Direct medical costs of Parkinson’s disease are more than double costs of those without the disease by 5 years after diagnosis.  
  • At least 50% of elderly residents of assisted living facilities have Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia.  
  • It costs an average of $4,766 more on healthcare per year for family caregivers who are caring for someone with Alzheimer’s compared to non-caregivers.  
  • A study of disease severity in 2003 showed that about 60% of assisted living residents with dementia were in the moderate or severe stages of the disease.  
  • The average diagnosis age for Parkinson’s disease in the U.S. is 70.5 years.