Silver Book Fact

The number of cancer patients age 85 and older is expected to increase four-fold by 2050.

Edwards, Brenda K., Holly L. Howe, Lynn A.G. Ries, Michael J. Thun, Harry M. Rosenberg, Rosemary Yancik, Phyllis A. Wingo, Ahmedin Jemal, and Ellen G. Feigal. Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1973-1999: Featuring implications of age and aging on U.S. cancer burden. Cancer. 2002; 94(10): 2766-92. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12173348

Reference

Title
Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1973-1999: Featuring implications of age and aging on U.S. cancer burden
Publication
Cancer
Publication Date
2002
Authors
Edwards, Brenda K., Holly L. Howe, Lynn A.G. Ries, Michael J. Thun, Harry M. Rosenberg, Rosemary Yancik, Phyllis A. Wingo, Ahmedin Jemal, and Ellen G. Feigal
Volume & Issue
Volume 94, Issue 10
Pages
2766-92
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Human Burden

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