Silver Book Fact

Lifetime risk of developing atrial fibrillation for men and women

The lifetime risk of developing atrial fibrillation is around 1 in 4 for both men and women age 40 and older.

Association. Circ 121(7):e46-215. Lloyd-Jones, DM, TJ Wang, EP Leip, MG Larson, D Levy, RS Vasan, RB Dâ??Agostino, JM Massaro, A Beiser, PA Wolf, and EJ Benjamin. Lifetime Risk for Development of Atrial Fibrillation: The Framingham Heart Study. Circ. 2004; 110(9): 1042-6. http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/short/110/9/1042

Reference

Title
Lifetime Risk for Development of Atrial Fibrillation: The Framingham Heart Study
Publication
Circ
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Association. Circ 121(7):e46-215. Lloyd-Jones, DM, TJ Wang, EP Leip, MG Larson, D Levy, RS Vasan, RB Dâ??Agostino, JM Massaro, A Beiser, PA Wolf, and EJ Benjamin
Volume & Issue
Volume 110, Issue 9
Pages
1042-6
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence

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