Silver Book Fact

The health share of the GDP is expected to hold steady in 2006 before it resumes a historical upward trend, reaching 19.6% of GDP by 2016.

Poisal, John A., Christopher Truffler, Sheila Smith, Andrea Sisko, Cathy Cowan, Sean Keehan, Bridget Dickensheets, and National Health Care Expenditures Team. Health Spending Projections Through 2016: Modest changes obscure Part D’s impact. Health Affairs. February 2007; http://content.healthaffairs.org/cgi/content/abstract/hlthaff.26.2.w242

Reference

Title
Health Spending Projections Through 2016: Modest changes obscure Part D’s impact
Publication
Health Affairs
Publication Date
February 2007
Authors
Poisal, John A., Christopher Truffler, Sheila Smith, Andrea Sisko, Cathy Cowan, Sean Keehan, Bridget Dickensheets, and National Health Care Expenditures Team
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Economic Burden

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