Silver Book Fact

The excess economic burden of visual impairment and blindess of individuals age 40 and older on the individual, caregivers, and other health care payers is an estimated $5.48 billion annually– $5.12 billion in additional medical care expenditures and $360 million in informal care costs.

Frick K, Gower E, Kempen J, Wolff J. Economic Impact of Visual Impairment and Blindness in the United States. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2007; 125(4): 544-50. http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/125/4/544

Reference

Title
Economic Impact of Visual Impairment and Blindness in the United States
Publication
Archives of Ophthalmology
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Frick K, Gower E, Kempen J, Wolff J
Volume & Issue
Volume 125, Issue 4
Pages
544-50
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

Related Facts

  • Quality of life of diabetic retinopathy patients
    A study evaluating quality of life using utility values, found that diabetic retinopathy patients with best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 and 20/25, were willing to trade 15% of their remaining…  
  • More than 2 million Americans age 50 and older have age-related macular degeneration (AMD)—2,069,403.  
  • Among those 65 and over, 18% are affected by vision trouble; 15 % of men and 19% of women.  Among those 85 and over, 28% report having trouble seeing.  
  • A study of Medicare beneficiaries with glaucoma showed that health care costs increased with degree of vision loss–ranging from $8,157 per year for no vision loss to $18,670 for blindness.  
  • Quality of Life Impact Top Concern from Vision Loss Among Individuals Polled
    “Quality of life” ranked as top concern by non-Hispanic Whites (73%), and Asians (68%)–when asked to consider various possible consequences of vision loss.  African Americans (66%) and Hispanics (63%) ranked…