Silver Book Fact

The data from the NEI-sponsored Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) found that persons with vision worse than 20/40 OU (oculur unitas, meaning “in both eyes) were more likely to be cognitively impaired than those with a visual acuity of 20/40 OU or better.

Clemons, Traci E., Molly W. Rankin, and Wendy L. McBee. Cognitive Impairment in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study: AREDS report no. 16. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2006; 124(4): 537-43. http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/124/4/537

Reference

Title
Cognitive Impairment in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study: AREDS report no. 16
Publication
Archives of Ophthalmology
Publication Date
2006
Authors
Clemons, Traci E., Molly W. Rankin, and Wendy L. McBee
Volume & Issue
Volume 124, Issue 4
Pages
537-43
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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