Silver Book Fact

10 most common pathogens leading to HAIs

Fact image

The 10 most common pathogens leading to HAIs:

  • Coagulase-negative staphylococci 15%
  • Staphylococcus aureus 15%
  • Enterococcus species 12%
  • Candida species 11%
  • Escherichia coli 10%
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa 8%
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae 6%
  • Enterobacter species 5%
  • Acinetobacter baumannii 3%
  • Klebsiella oxytoca 2%

Hidron A, Edwards J, Patel J, Horan T, et al. Antimicrobial-Resistant Pathogens Associated with Healthcare-Associated Infections: Annual summary of data reported to the National Healthcare Safety Network at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006-2007. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2008; 29(11): 996-1011. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/591861

Reference

Title
Antimicrobial-Resistant Pathogens Associated with Healthcare-Associated Infections: Annual summary of data reported to the National Healthcare Safety Network at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006-2007
Publication
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol
Publication Date
2008
Authors
Hidron A, Edwards J, Patel J, Horan T, et al.
Volume & Issue
Volume 29, Issue 11
Pages
996-1011
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence

Related Facts

  • Sepsis in hospitalized patients
    Hospitalized patients with sepsis who survived to 31 days experienced a 16.2% absolute increase in late mortality.  
  • MRSA kills more than emphysema, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s, and homicide combined
    In one year, MRSA killed more Americans (~19,000) than emphysema, HIV/AIDS, Parkinson’s disease, and homicide combined.  
  • ~70% of hospital HAIs resistant to ≥ antimicrobial
    Approximately 70% of hospital-acquired HAIs are resistant to at least one antimicrobial drug.  
  • Sepsis accounts for nearly 1/2 of ICU expenditures
    Infection and related sepsis/septicemia account for 40% of all ICU expenditures.  
  • Antibacterial resistant pathogens responsible for most of 99,000 HAI related deaths
    The majority of the 99,000 patients who die from healthcare-associated infections each year, are due to antibacterial-resistant pathogens.