Silver Book Fact

10 most common pathogens leading to HAIs

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The 10 most common pathogens leading to HAIs:

  • Coagulase-negative staphylococci 15%
  • Staphylococcus aureus 15%
  • Enterococcus species 12%
  • Candida species 11%
  • Escherichia coli 10%
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa 8%
  • Klebsiella pneumoniae 6%
  • Enterobacter species 5%
  • Acinetobacter baumannii 3%
  • Klebsiella oxytoca 2%

Hidron, Alicia I., Jonathan R. Edwards, Jean Patel, Teresa C. Horan, Dawn M. Sievert, Daniel A. Pollack, and Scott K. Fridkin. Antimicrobial-Resistant Pathogens Associated with Healthcare-Associated Infections: Annual summary of data reported to the National Healthcare Safety Network at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006-2007. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2008; 29(11): 996-1011. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/591861

Reference

Title
Antimicrobial-Resistant Pathogens Associated with Healthcare-Associated Infections: Annual summary of data reported to the National Healthcare Safety Network at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2006-2007
Publication
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol
Publication Date
2008
Authors
Hidron, Alicia I., Jonathan R. Edwards, Jean Patel, Teresa C. Horan, Dawn M. Sievert, Daniel A. Pollack, and Scott K. Fridkin
Volume & Issue
Volume 29, Issue 11
Pages
996-1011
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence

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