Silver Book Fact

Survival Rates of SAS Patients with and without SAVR

Patients with severe aortic stenosis (SAS) ages 80+ who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) have 1-year, 2-year, and 5-year survival rates of 87%, 78%, and 68% respectively — compared with 52%, 40%, and 22% for those patients who did not have surgery.

Varadarajan P, Kapoor N, Bansal R, Pai R. Survival in Elderly Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis is Dramatically Improved by Aortic Valve Replacement: Results from a cohort of 233 patients aged ≥ 80 years. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg. 2006; 30(5): 722-7. https://academic.oup.com/ejcts/article/30/5/722/361607/Survival-in-elderly-patients-with-severe-aortic

Reference

Title
Survival in Elderly Patients with Severe Aortic Stenosis is Dramatically Improved by Aortic Valve Replacement: Results from a cohort of 233 patients aged ≥ 80 years
Publication
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg
Publication Date
2006
Authors
Varadarajan P, Kapoor N, Bansal R, Pai R
Volume & Issue
Volume 30, Issue 5
Pages
722-7
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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