Silver Book Fact

Six months after a hip fracture, many patients are unable to return to their activities of daily living at pre-fracture status:

  • 49% could dress themselves–compared to 86% before the fracture
  • 32% could move from chair to standing–compared to 90% before
  • 15% could walk independently across the room–compared to 75% before
  • 8% could climb a flight of stairs–compared to 63% before

Marottoli, Richard A., Lisa Berkman, and Leo Cooney. Decline in Physical Function Following Hip Fracture. J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992; 40(9): 861-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1512379

Reference

Title
Decline in Physical Function Following Hip Fracture
Publication
J Am Geriatr Soc
Publication Date
1992
Authors
Marottoli, Richard A., Lisa Berkman, and Leo Cooney
Volume & Issue
Volume 40, Issue 9
Pages
861-6
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

Related Facts

  • The risk of death in the first few weeks after hip fracture is 10 times more than the expected death rate.  
  • Two or more vertebral fractures increase risk of a subsequent vertebral fracture by 12-fold.  
  • Patients who have an osteoporosis diagnosis and an injury were admitted to the emergency room more often than the average hospitalization–67.3% versus 55.7%, respectively.  
  • More than 1/4 of individuals who suffer a hip fracture become disabled within a year.  
  • The annual number of osteoporosis-related fractures is expected to rise by almost 50% to more than 3 million by 2025.