Silver Book Fact

One study shows that electrical spinal cord stimulation significantly improved motor function in an animal model of Parkinson’s disease.

Fuentes, Romulo, Per Petersson, William B. Siesser, Marc G. Caron, and Miguel A. Nicolelis. Spinal Cord Stimulation Restores Locomotion in Animal Models of Parkinsonâ??s Disease. Science. 2009; 323(5921): 1578-82. http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/abstract/sci;323/5921/1578

Reference

Title
Spinal Cord Stimulation Restores Locomotion in Animal Models of Parkinsonâ??s Disease
Publication
Science
Publication Date
2009
Authors
Fuentes, Romulo, Per Petersson, William B. Siesser, Marc G. Caron, and Miguel A. Nicolelis
Volume & Issue
Volume 323, Issue 5921
Pages
1578-82
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Future Value

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