Silver Book Fact

Of those who were ambulatory before their hip fracture, 1 in 5 end up needing long-term care afterwards–a situation that participants in this study said was less desirable than death.

Salkeld, Glenn, Ian D. Cameron, Robert G. Cumming, S. Easter, Jamie Seymour, Susan E. Kurrle, and Susan Quine. Quality of Life Related to Fear of Falling and Hip Fracture in Older Women: A time trade off study. BMJ. 2000; 320(7231): 341-6. http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/320/7231/341

Reference

Title
Quality of Life Related to Fear of Falling and Hip Fracture in Older Women: A time trade off study
Publication
BMJ
Publication Date
2000
Authors
Salkeld, Glenn, Ian D. Cameron, Robert G. Cumming, S. Easter, Jamie Seymour, Susan E. Kurrle, and Susan Quine
Volume & Issue
Volume 320, Issue 7231
Pages
341-6
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

Related Facts

  • Hip fractures account for 72% of total costs related to osteoporosis related fractures.  
  • From 2001 to 2003, about 2.39 million fractures occurred among women aged 65 and older with osteoporosis–this cost Medicare $12.96 billion.  
  • By 2020, more than 50% of Americans over the age of 50 will be diagnosed with or at risk of developing osteoporosis.  
  • “This 73-year-old wife and grandmother suffered her first fracture 18 years ago and has had eight additional fractures since that time. Each caused tremendous pain and required long hospital stays…  
  • The 1-year morality after a hip fracture increases from 20% in individuals younger than 70 years, to close to 40% in those between 80 and 89.9 years old.