Silver Book Fact

Of those who were ambulatory before their hip fracture, 1 in 5 end up needing long-term care afterwards–a situation that participants in this study said was less desirable than death.

Salkeld G, Cameron I, Cumming R, Easter S, et al. Quality of Life Related to Fear of Falling and Hip Fracture in Older Women: A time trade off study. BMJ. 2000; 320(7231): 341-6. http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/320/7231/341

Reference

Title
Quality of Life Related to Fear of Falling and Hip Fracture in Older Women: A time trade off study
Publication
BMJ
Publication Date
2000
Authors
Salkeld G, Cameron I, Cumming R, Easter S, et al
Volume & Issue
Volume 320, Issue 7231
Pages
341-6
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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