Silver Book Fact

Late Mortality and Sepsis

Compared with patients not in the hospital, sepsis in hospitalized patients was associated with a 22.1%  increase in late mortality during a 2 year follow-up period.

Late Mortality After Sepsis: Propensity matched cohort study. BMJ. 2016; 353. http://www.bmj.com/content/353/bmj.i2375

Reference

Title
Late Mortality After Sepsis: Propensity matched cohort study
Publication
BMJ
Publication Date
2016
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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