Silver Book Fact

Ischemic stroke survivors who were 65 years and older had the following disabilities 6 months after their stroke:
• 50% had some one-sided paralysis
• 30% needed help walking
• 26% needed help with activities of daily living
• 19% had trouble speaking or understanding speech
• 35% had symptoms of depression
• 26% were admitted to nursing homes

Kelly-Hayes M, A Beiser, CS Kase, A Scaramucci, RB Dâ??Agostino, and PA Wolf. The Influence of Gender and Age on Disability Following Ischemic Stroke: The Framingham Study. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2002; 12(3): 119-26. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17903915

Reference

Title
The Influence of Gender and Age on Disability Following Ischemic Stroke: The Framingham Study
Publication
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis
Publication Date
2002
Authors
Kelly-Hayes M, A Beiser, CS Kase, A Scaramucci, RB Dâ??Agostino, and PA Wolf
Volume & Issue
Volume 12, Issue 3
Pages
119-26
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

Related Facts

  • Lifespan of Medicare patients with sSAS who do not undergo treatment
    Medicare patients with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (sSAS) who do not undergo treatment have an average lifespan of 1.8 years.  
  • More than 1 in 3 American adults (81.1 million) have one or more types of cardiovascular disease.  
  • Between 2010 and 2030, the number of survivors of heart disease is expected to grow at a much faster rate than the U.S. population as a whole.  
  • In adults >55 years of age, the lifetime risk for stroke is greater than 1 in 6.  
  • 1 and 6-month mortality rates without treatment for sSAS
    Waiting for treatment for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (sSAS) can be deadly, with 1-month mortality at 3.7% and 6-month mortality at 11.6% (measured from the time intervention was recommended).