Silver Book Fact

Initiating and continuing beta-blocker use in most first-time heart attack survivors for 20 years would result in 72,000 fewer coronary heart disease deaths, 62,000 fewer heart attacks, and 447,000 gained life-years. Additionally, it would save up to $18 million.

Phiillips K, Shlipak M, Coxon P, Heidenreich P, et al. Health and Economic Benefits of Increased Beta-Blocker Use Following Myocardial Infarction. JAMA. 2000; 284(21): 2748-54. http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/284/21/2748

Reference

Title
Health and Economic Benefits of Increased Beta-Blocker Use Following Myocardial Infarction
Publication
JAMA
Publication Date
2000
Authors
Phiillips K, Shlipak M, Coxon P, Heidenreich P, et al.
Volume & Issue
Volume 284, Issue 21
Pages
2748-54
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Future Value

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