Silver Book Fact

Initiating and continuing beta-blocker use in most first-time heart attack survivors for 20 years would result in 72,000 fewer coronary heart disease deaths, 62,000 fewer heart attacks, and 447,000 gained life-years. Additionally, it would save up to $18 million.

Phillips, Kathryn A., Michael G. Shlipak, Pamela Coxson, Paul A. Heidenreich, Myriam G. Hunink, Paula A. Goldman, Lawrence W. Williams, Milton C. Weinstein, and Lee Goldman. Health and Economic Benefits of Increased Beta-Blocker Use Following Myocardial Infarction. JAMA. 2000; 284(21): 2748-54. http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/284/21/2748

Reference

Title
Health and Economic Benefits of Increased Beta-Blocker Use Following Myocardial Infarction
Publication
JAMA
Publication Date
2000
Authors
Phillips, Kathryn A., Michael G. Shlipak, Pamela Coxson, Paul A. Heidenreich, Myriam G. Hunink, Paula A. Goldman, Lawrence W. Williams, Milton C. Weinstein, and Lee Goldman
Volume & Issue
Volume 284, Issue 21
Pages
2748-54
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Future Value

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