Silver Book Fact

In 2011, the leading causes of death in the U.S. were chronic
diseases: heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases, and stroke (cerebrovascular diseases).

Hoyert, Donna, Jiaquan Xu. Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2011. Hyattsville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Center for Health Statistics; October 2012. www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr61/nvsr61_06.pdf

Reference

Title
Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2011
Publisher
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Center for Health Statistics
Publication Date
October 2012
Authors
Hoyert, Donna, Jiaquan Xu
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence
  • Human Burden

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