Silver Book Fact

In 2002, the prevalence of dementia among individuals aged 71 and older was approximately 3.4 million Americans.

Plassman, Brenda L, Kenneth M. Langa, Gwenith G. Fisher, Steven G. Heeringa, David R. Weir, Mary Beth Ofstedal, J.R. Burke, M.D. Hurd, G.G. Potter, W.L. Rogers, D.C. Steffens, Robert J. Willis, and Robert B. Wallace. Prevalence of Dementia in the United States: The aging, demographics, and memory study. Neuroepidemiology. 2007; 29: 125-32. http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Aktion=ShowAbstract&ArtikelNr=109998&Ausgabe=233821&ProduktNr=224263

Reference

Title
Prevalence of Dementia in the United States: The aging, demographics, and memory study
Publication
Neuroepidemiology
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Plassman, Brenda L, Kenneth M. Langa, Gwenith G. Fisher, Steven G. Heeringa, David R. Weir, Mary Beth Ofstedal, J.R. Burke, M.D. Hurd, G.G. Potter, W.L. Rogers, D.C. Steffens, Robert J. Willis, and Robert B. Wallace
Pages
125-32
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Age - A Major Risk Factor

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