Silver Book Fact

Heart disease costs the U.S. $108.9 billion a year–including direct medical expenses and indirect cost in lost of productivity.

Heidenreich, PA, JG Trogdon, OA Khaviou, J Butler, K Dracup, MD Ezekowitz, EA Finkelstein, Y Hong, SC Johnston, A Khora, DM Lloyd-Jones, SA Nelson, G Nichol, D Orenstein, PW Wilson, and YJ Woo. Forecasting the Future of Cardiovascular Disease in the United States: A policy statement from the American Heart Association. Circ. 2011; 123: 933-44. http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/early/2011/01/24/CIR.0b013e31820a55f5.abstract

Reference

Title
Forecasting the Future of Cardiovascular Disease in the United States: A policy statement from the American Heart Association
Publication
Circ
Publication Date
2011
Authors
Heidenreich, PA, JG Trogdon, OA Khaviou, J Butler, K Dracup, MD Ezekowitz, EA Finkelstein, Y Hong, SC Johnston, A Khora, DM Lloyd-Jones, SA Nelson, G Nichol, D Orenstein, PW Wilson, and YJ Woo
Pages
933-44
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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