Silver Book Fact

Four months after a hip fracture, less than 20% of patients recovered their prefracture competence in activities.

Van Balen R, Essink-Bot M, Steyerberg E, Cools H, et al. Quality of Life After Hip Fracture: A comparison of four health status measures in 208 patients. Disabil Rehabil. 2003; 25(10): 508-19. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0963828031000090443

Reference

Title
Quality of Life After Hip Fracture: A comparison of four health status measures in 208 patients
Publication
Disabil Rehabil
Publication Date
2003
Authors
Van Balen R, Essink-Bot M, Steyerberg E, Cools H, et al
Volume & Issue
Volume 25, Issue 10
Pages
508-19
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

Related Facts

  • By 2030, an estimated 64.3 million American adults will have low bone mass.  
  • At the age of 50, a white man has a: 6% chance of experiencing a hip fracture 5% chance of experiencing a vertebral fracture 2.5% chance of experiencing a forearm fracture  
  • The cost of a hip fracture for one individual over their lifetime can be more than $81,000–nearly half can be attributed to nursing facility costs.  
  • At the age of 50, a white woman has a: 17.5% chance of experiencing a hip fracture 15.6% chance of experiencing a vertebral fracture 16% chance of experiencing a forearm fracture  
  • One study found that women age 65 and older who suffered a vertebral fracture were more than twice as likely to suffer back pain than women who hadn’t.