Silver Book Fact

Eliminating out-of-pocket drug costs for combination pharmacotherapy for the 423,000 Americans with drug insurance who will experience their first myocardial infarction in 2006 would save 4,736 lives, and would save insurers more than $2.5 billion.

Choudhry, Niteesh, Jerry Avorn, Elliot M. Antman, Sebastian Schneeweiss, and William H. Shrank. Should Patients Receive Secondary Prevention Medications For Free After A Myocardial Infarction? An economic analysis. Health Affairs. 2007; 26(1): 186-194. https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/abs/10.1377/hlthaff.26.1.186?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed

Reference

Title
Should Patients Receive Secondary Prevention Medications For Free After A Myocardial Infarction? An economic analysis
Publication
Health Affairs
Publisher
Project HOPE
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Choudhry, Niteesh, Jerry Avorn, Elliot M. Antman, Sebastian Schneeweiss, and William H. Shrank
Volume & Issue
Volume 26, Issue 1
Pages
186-194
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Future Value

Related Facts

  • The percentage of Americans age 55-64 with high cholesterol decreased between 1988-94 and 1999-2002, in part because of the increased awareness about the risks of high cholesterol and the increased…  
  • During the 1970s and 1980s, the gains associated with the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease totaled $31 trillion.  
  • Aspirin, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins, when taken in combination, have been estimated to reduce the relative risk of coronary heart disease mortality by 80%, compared with a placebo.  
  • In the absence of antihypertensive drug therapy, there would have been an estimated 572,000 more hospital discharges for stroke in 2002, and 261,000 more discharges for myocardial infarction. The…  
  • Antihypertensive treatment has generated a benefit-to-cost ratio of at least 6:1 (6:1 in women and 10:1 in men).