Silver Book Fact

Eliminating out-of-pocket drug costs for combination pharmacotherapy for the 423,000 Americans with drug insurance who will experience their first myocardial infarction in 2006 would save 4,736 lives, and would save insurers more than $2.5 billion.

Choudhry, Niteesh, Jerry Avorn, Elliot M. Antman, Sebastian Schneeweiss, and William H. Shrank. Should Patients Receive Secondary Prevention Medications For Free After A Myocardial Infarction? An economic analysis. Health Affairs. 2007; 26(1): 186-194. https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/abs/10.1377/hlthaff.26.1.186?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed

Reference

Title
Should Patients Receive Secondary Prevention Medications For Free After A Myocardial Infarction? An economic analysis
Publication
Health Affairs
Publisher
Project HOPE
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Choudhry, Niteesh, Jerry Avorn, Elliot M. Antman, Sebastian Schneeweiss, and William H. Shrank
Volume & Issue
Volume 26, Issue 1
Pages
186-194
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Future Value

Related Facts

  • From 1979 to 2005, the number of cardiac catheterizations increased 342% to 1,322,000 annually.  
  • Satisfaction with HVD Treatment
    Among treated heart valve disease (HVD), 96% express “full satisfaction” and 78% are “very satisfied” with their treatment.  
  • Every $1 spent on technological innovations in heart attack care has produced an estimated $7 gain.  
  • Hospitalization from incorrect diagnosis of heart attacks costs $12 billion per year. If creatine kinase, myoglobin and troponin are used for detecting heart attack in ER patients with chest pain,…  
  • There are 23 medicines in development for stroke, the third leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer.