Silver Book Fact

Eliminating out-of-pocket drug costs for combination pharmacotherapy for the 423,000 Americans with drug insurance who will experience their first myocardial infarction in 2006 would save 4,736 lives, and would save insurers more than $2.5 billion.

Choudhry N, Avorn J, Antman EM, Schneeweiss S, Shrank WH. Should Patients Receive Secondary Prevention Medications For Free After A Myocardial Infarction? An economic analysis. Health Affairs. 2007; 26(1): 186-194. https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/abs/10.1377/hlthaff.26.1.186?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed

Reference

Title
Should Patients Receive Secondary Prevention Medications For Free After A Myocardial Infarction? An economic analysis
Publication
Health Affairs
Publisher
Project HOPE
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Choudhry N, Avorn J, Antman EM, Schneeweiss S, Shrank WH
Volume & Issue
Volume 26, Issue 1
Pages
186-194
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Future Value

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