Silver Book Fact

During the twentieth century, cumulative gains in life expectancy, for both men and women, were worth over $1.2 million per person.

Murphy K, Topel R. The Value of Health and Longevity. National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper. May-2005; 11405. http://www.nber.org/papers/W11405

Reference

Title
The Value of Health and Longevity
Publication
National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper
Publication Date
May-2005
Authors
Murphy K, Topel R
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Economic Value

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