Silver Book Fact

Dementia is correlated with a significantly higher out-of-pocket expenditure for medical care compared with those who have normal cognitive function. In 1995, the annual out-of-pocket expenditure was $1,350 for Americans without dementia, $2,150 for those with mild/moderate dementia, and $3,010 for those with severe dementia.

Langa K, Larson E, Weir D, Willis R, et al. Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenditures Among Older Americans With Dementia. Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders. 2004; 18(2): 90-98. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15249853/

Reference

Title
Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenditures Among Older Americans With Dementia
Publication
Alzheimer Disease & Associated Disorders
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Langa K, Larson E, Weir D, Willis R, et al.
Volume & Issue
Volume 18, Issue 2
Pages
90-98
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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