Silver Book Fact

Coronary artery disease accounts for 51% of all heart disease, and if no preventative drugs are made available, is projected to cost the nation $75.8 billion by 2025, up from $51.9 billion in 1999.

Steinwachs, Donald M., Ruth L. Collins-Nakai, Lawrence H. Cohn, Arthur Garson, Jr., and Michael J. Wolk. The Future of Cardiology: Utilization and costs of care. J Am Coll Cardiol. 2000; 35(4): 1092-9. https://www.google.com/search?q=The+Future+of+Cardiology%3A+Utilization+and+costs+of+care&rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&oq=The+Future+of+Cardiology%3A+Utilization+and+costs+of+care&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60j69i64l2.624j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Reference

Title
The Future of Cardiology: Utilization and costs of care
Publication
J Am Coll Cardiol
Publication Date
2000
Authors
Steinwachs, Donald M., Ruth L. Collins-Nakai, Lawrence H. Cohn, Arthur Garson, Jr., and Michael J. Wolk
Volume & Issue
Volume 35, Issue 4
Pages
1092-9
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Economic Burden

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