Silver Book Fact

Global use of vaccine prevents death

Compared to estimated deaths without vaccination, global use of vaccination in 2001 prevented: 61% of measles deaths; 69% of tetanus deaths; 78% of pertussis (whooping cough) deaths; 94% of diphtheria deaths; and 98% of polio deaths.

Brenzel, Logan, Lara J. Wolfson, Julia Fox-Rushby, Mark Miller, and Neal A. Halsey. Vaccine-Preventable Diseases In: Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries (Second Edition). Disease Control in Developing Countries. 2006; 389-412. http://elibrary.worldbank.org/doi/pdf/10.1596/978-0-8213-6179-5

Reference

Title
Vaccine-Preventable Diseases In: Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries (Second Edition)
Publication
Disease Control in Developing Countries
Publisher
Oxford University Press and The World Bank
Publication Date
2006
Authors
Brenzel, Logan, Lara J. Wolfson, Julia Fox-Rushby, Mark Miller, and Neal A. Halsey
Pages
389-412
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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