Silver Book Fact

Close to $11 billion of the $11.1 billion in direct nonmedical costs for adults with visual disorders goes to nursing home care.

Rein, David B., Ping Zhang, Kathleen E. Wirth, Paul P. Lee, Thomas J. Hoerger, Nancy McCall, Ronald Klein, James M. Tielsch, Sandeep Vijan, and Jinan Saaddine. The Economic Burden of Major Adult Visual Disorders in the United States. Arch Opthalmol. 2006; 124(12): 1754-60. http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/124/12/1754

Reference

Title
The Economic Burden of Major Adult Visual Disorders in the United States
Publication
Arch Opthalmol
Publication Date
2006
Authors
Rein, David B., Ping Zhang, Kathleen E. Wirth, Paul P. Lee, Thomas J. Hoerger, Nancy McCall, Ronald Klein, James M. Tielsch, Sandeep Vijan, and Jinan Saaddine
Volume & Issue
Volume 124, Issue 12
Pages
1754-60
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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