Silver Book Fact

By 2020, the number of Americans age 40 and older who are blind or have low vision is projected to reach 5.5 million– growing from 3.3 million in 2004.

Congdon, Nathan G., Benita J. O'Colmain, Caroline C.W. Klaver, Ronald Klein, Beatriz Munoz, David S. Friedman, John Kempen, Hugh R. Taylor, Paul Mitchell, and Leslie Hyman. Causes and Prevalence of Visual Impairment Among Adults in the United States. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2004; 122(4): 477-85. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=AbstractPlus&list_uids=15078664

Reference

Title
Causes and Prevalence of Visual Impairment Among Adults in the United States
Publication
Archives of Ophthalmology
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Congdon, Nathan G., Benita J. O'Colmain, Caroline C.W. Klaver, Ronald Klein, Beatriz Munoz, David S. Friedman, John Kempen, Hugh R. Taylor, Paul Mitchell, and Leslie Hyman
Volume & Issue
Volume 122, Issue 4
Pages
477-85
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Human Burden

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