Silver Book Fact

Blindness (compared to no visual impairment) is associated with more than $2,000 in excess annual medical expenses per person.

Frick, Kevin D., Emily W. Gower, John H. Kempen, and Jennifer L. Wolff. Economic Impact of Visual Impairment and Blindness in the United States. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2007; 125(4): 544-50. http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/125/4/544

Reference

Title
Economic Impact of Visual Impairment and Blindness in the United States
Publication
Archives of Ophthalmology
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Frick, Kevin D., Emily W. Gower, John H. Kempen, and Jennifer L. Wolff
Volume & Issue
Volume 125, Issue 4
Pages
544-50
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

Related Facts

  • Close to 50% of participants in the NEI-sponsored Los Angeles Latino Eye Study (LALES) who had diabetes, also had diabetic retinopathy.  
  • Annual Total Burden to the U.S. Economy of AMD, Cararact, Diabetic Retinopathy, Glaucoma, Refractive Errors, Visual Impairment and Blindness  
  • Americans age 80 and older have the highest rates of blindness. They are also the fastest growing segment of our population.  
  • The average cost in 2004 per glaucoma patient age 40 to 64 using outpatient services was $276. The average cost per patient 54 years and older was $254.  
  • For those at high risk of advanced AMD, high dGI (dietary glycemic index) diets increased the risk of developing advanced AMD by 17%.