Silver Book Fact

Based on preliminary data from 2004, the top 15 causes of death in the United States in 2004 were:

  • 1. Disease of the heart – 654,092 deaths
  • 2. Malignant neoplasms – 550-270 deaths
  • 3. Cerebrovascular diseases – 150,147 deaths
  • 4. Chronic lower respiratory diseases – 123,884 deaths
  • 5. Accidents (unintentional injuries) – 108,694 deaths
  • 6. Diabetes mellitus – 72,815 deaths
  • 7. Alzheimer’s disease – 65,829 deaths
  • 8. Influenza and pneumonia – 61,472 deaths
  • 9. Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome, and nephrosis – 42,762 deaths
  • 10. Septicemia – 33,464 deaths
  • 11. Intentional self-harm (suicide) – 31,647 deaths
  • 12. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis – 26,549 deaths
  • 13. Essential (primary) hypertension and hypertensive renal disease – 22,953 deaths
  • 14. Parkinson’s disease – 18,018 deaths
  • 15. Pneumonitis due to solids and liquids – 16,959 deaths

Minino, Arialdi, Melonie Heron, and Betty L. Smith. Deaths: Preliminary data for 2004. Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: National Center for Health Statistics; 2004. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/products/pubs/pubd/hestats/prelimdeaths04/preliminarydeaths04.htm

Reference

Title
Deaths: Preliminary data for 2004
Publisher
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: National Center for Health Statistics
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Minino, Arialdi, Melonie Heron, and Betty L. Smith
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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