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Atrial Fibrillation is Increasingly Prevalent in the United States

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Atrial Fibrillation is Increasingly Prevalent in the United States

Go A, Hylek E, Phillips K, Chang Y, et al. Prevalence of Diagnosed Atrial Fibrillation in Adults: National implications for rhythm management and stroke prevention: the AnTicoagulation and Risk Factors In Atrial Fibrillation (ATRIA) Study. JAMA. 2001; 285(18): 2370-5. http://jama.ama-assn.org/content/285/18/2370.abstract

Reference

Title
Prevalence of Diagnosed Atrial Fibrillation in Adults: National implications for rhythm management and stroke prevention: the AnTicoagulation and Risk Factors In Atrial Fibrillation (ATRIA) Study
Publication
JAMA
Publication Date
2001
Authors
Go A, Hylek E, Phillips K, Chang Y, et al.
Volume & Issue
Volume 285, Issue 18
Pages
2370-5
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence

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